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    Sentence Basics

  • Sentence Basics

    Worksheet Title
    Agreement of Subject and Verb 1
    The verb form must always agree with the subject. For singular subjects, add an (s) to the end of most verb forms.
    Agreement of Subject and Verb 2
    The verb form must always agree with the subject. For singular subjects use: is/am, has, or was. For plural subjects use: are, have, or were.
    Agreement of Subject and Verb 3
    The verb form must always agree with the subject. Use ?there is? when the subject is singular. Use ?there are? when the subject is plural.
    Agreement of Subject and Verb 4
    The verb form must always agree with the subject. Collective nouns name groups of things.
    Agreement of Subject and Verb 5
    The verb form must always agree with the subject. Be careful that the verb agrees with the subject of the sentence and not the noun in an intervening phrase.
    Complete Sentences about Animals
    A complete sentence must have a subject and a verb, and it must express a complete thought. Phrases and dependent clauses cannot stand alone as sentences.
    Complete Sentences about Food
    A complete sentence must have a subject and a verb, and it must express a complete thought. Phrases and dependent clauses cannot stand alone as sentences.
    Complete Sentences about Jobs
    A complete sentence must have a subject and a verb, and it must express a complete thought. Phrases and dependent clauses cannot stand alone as sentences.
    Complete Sentences about Play
    A complete sentence must have a subject and a verb, and it must express a complete thought. Phrases and dependent clauses cannot stand alone as sentences.
    Complete Sentences about Sports
    A complete sentence must have a subject and a verb, and it must express a complete thought. Phrases and dependent clauses cannot stand alone as sentences.
    Complete Sentences about Transportation
    A complete sentence must have a subject and a verb, and it must express a complete thought. Phrases and dependent clauses cannot stand alone as sentences.
    Double Negatives 1
    Two negative expressions in one sentence should be avoided.   In expressions with both no and not, options may include dropping a negative expression, substituting any or a(n) for no, or changing the not phrase into a positive expression.
    Double Negatives 1 (Intermediate)
    Two negative expressions in one sentence should be avoided.   In expressions with both no and not, options may include dropping a negative expression, substituting any or a(n) for no, or changing the not phrase into a positive expression.
    Double Negatives 2
    Two negative expressions in one sentence should be avoided.   In expressions with both no and not, options may include dropping a negative expression, substituting any or a(n) for no, or changing the not phrase into a positive expression.
    Double Negatives 2 (Intermediate)
    Two negative expressions in one sentence should be avoided.   In expressions with both no and not, options may include dropping a negative expression, substituting any or a(n) for no, or changing the not phrase into a positive expression.
    Possessive Case of Nouns
    Possessive nouns show ownership of something by someone or something specific by adding ‘s to the end of a singular noun or an apostrophe to a plural noun. For example: the girl‘s books the girls’ books In singular nouns of more than one syllable that end in an s-sound, only the apostrophe may be added. […]
    Possessive Pronouns
    Possessive pronouns are used in place of one or more nouns and show ownership. The possessive pronouns are: mine, yours, his, hers, ours, and theirs. Apostrophes are not used with possessive pronouns.
    Possessive Pronouns Used as Adjectives
    Possessive adjectives are used to describe a noun, and come before it. The possessive adjectives are: my, your, her, his, its, our, and their.

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