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  • Word Confusion

    Worksheet Title
    Word Confusion: A few, A little
    Use “a few” for quantities that can be counted one by one. Use “a little” for quantities that cannot be counted.
    Word Confusion: A, An
    Use “a” before nouns and noun phrases that refer to a single but unspecified person or thing. Use “an” as an article to precede words that begin with a vowel or a vowel sound, like the unpronounced “h” in “honest” or “hour.”
    Word Confusion: Accept, Except
    “Accept” means to receive or to admit. “Except” can be a preposition indicating exclusion or it serve as a conjunction meaning “if it were not for.”
    Word Confusion: Accept, Except (Advanced)
    “Accept” means to receive or to admit. “Except” can be a preposition indicating exclusion or it serve as a conjunction meaning “if it were not for.”
    Word Confusion: Advice, Advise
    “Advice” is a noun that means “suggestions, tips, or warnings.” “Advise” is a verb that means “to give advice.”
    Word Confusion: Affect, Effect
    “Affect” is a verb that means “to influence.” “Effect” is a noun that means “an influence.”
    Word Confusion: Almost, Most
    “Almost” means not quite or nearly. “Most” means the majority of. “Most” also means greater in number.
    Word Confusion: Among, Between
    “Among” is a preposition used for more than two people or things. “Between” is a preposition used for two people or things, or if a comparison or opposition is used.
    Word Confusion: Amount, Number
    “Amount” applies to quantities that cannot be counted one by one. “Number” applies to quantities that can be counted one by one.
    Word Confusion: Amount, Number about Career, Office, Business
    “Amount” applies to quantities that cannot be counted one by one. “Number” applies to quantities that can be counted one by one.
    Word Confusion: Beside, Besides
    “Besides” means in addition to. “Beside” means located next to.
    Word Confusion: Beside, Besides (Advanced)
    “Besides” means in addition to. “Beside” means located next to.
    Word Confusion: Borrow, Lend about Career, Office, Business
    “Lend” means to give something temporarily with the expectation of its return. It is often followed by a preposition phrase using “to.” “Borrow” means to take something temporarily with the intention to give it back. It is often followed by a prepositional phrase using “from.”
    Word Confusion: Borrow, Lend about The City
    “Borrow” means to take something temporarily with the intention to give it back. It is often followed by a prepositional phrase using “from.” “Lend” means to give something temporarily with the expectation of its return. It is often followed by a preposition phrase using “to.”
    Word Confusion: Capital, Capitol
    A “capital” is the city that serves as the home of the government. The “capitol” is the building that serves as the meeting place or home of the government; it is the building where the legislature meets. Capitalize “capitol” when it refers to the specific building.
    Word Confusion: Cease, Seize
    “Cease” means to bring to an end or to come to an end. “Seize” means to take or grab suddenly or forcefully.
    Word Confusion: Disinterested, Uninterested
    “Uninterested” indicates a lack of interest. “Disinterested? means not influenced by selfish motives . It can also mean or unaffected by the outcome.
    Word Confusion: Do, Make
    “Do” means to perform or execute. “Make” means to create something; to bring about or cause.
    Word Confusion: Emigrate, Immigrate
    “Emigrate” is to leave a country or region to move to a new place. “Immigrate” is to enter and settle in a new country or region.
    Word Confusion: Fewer, Less about Career, Office, Business
    “Less” refers to amount, that is, things measured in bulk quantity. We use “fewer” when referring to number, that is, things that may be counted.
    Word Confusion: Fewer, Less about School
    “Less” refers to amount, that is, things measured in bulk quantity. We use “fewer” when referring to number, that is, things that may be counted.
    Word Confusion: For, Four about Career, Office, Business
    “Four” is a number referring to a specific quantity. “For” is a preposition that generally means “in order to” or “intended for.”
    Word Confusion: For, Four about Plants
    “Four” is a number referring to a specific quantity. “For” is a preposition that generally means “in order to” or “intended for.”
    Word Confusion: For, Since
    “For” is used when referring to a period of time. “Since” is used when referring to a time or date when some event began.
    Word Confusion: Good, Well
    “Good” is an adjective that describes a noun. “Well” is used as an adverb that modifies an action word or verb.
    Word Confusion: Good, Well about School
    “Good” is an adjective that describes a noun. “Well” is used as an adverb that modifies an action word or verb.
    Word Confusion: Here, Hear
    “Here” can be a noun, adverb, adjective, or interjection that refers to a present place, time, or state. “Hear” is a noun meaning to perceive sound or to listen.
    Word Confusion: Imply, Infer
    “Imply” means to suggest or express indirectly. “Infer” means to conclude based on the provided evidence.
    Word Confusion: In, Into about Career, Office, Business
    “In” generally indicates an enclosed location or means “during.” “Into” expresses a change of state or refers to moving towards something.
    Word Confusion: In, Into about The City
    “In” generally indicates an enclosed location or means “during.” “Into” expresses a change of state or refers to moving towards something.
    Word Confusion: Its, It’s
    “Its” is the possessive form of “it.” “It’s” is a contraction. It can always be replaced by “it is” or “it has.”
    Word Confusion: Its, It’s about Career, Office, Business
    “Its” is the possessive form of “it.” “It’s” is the contraction of ?it is? or “it has.”
    Word Confusion: Its, It’s about The City
    “Its” is the possessive form of “it.” “It’s” is a contraction. It can always be replaced by “it is” or “it has.”
    Word Confusion: Later, Latter
    “Later” means at some time after. “Latter” means the second of two things.
    Word Confusion: Later, Latter about Career, Office, Business
    “Later” means at some time after. “Latter” means the second of two things.
    Word Confusion: Learn, Teach
    To “learn” is to gain knowledge or skills. One can learn from being taught. To “teach” is to help someone learn or to impart skills and knowledge.
    Word Confusion: Loose, Lose
    “Loose” is an adjective that can mean not tight, not bound, not fastened, or relaxed.. “Lose” is a verb that means to misplace or be unable to find something.
    Word Confusion: Loose, Lose about Animals
    “Loose” is an adjective that can mean not tight, not bound, not fastened, or relaxed. “Lose” is a verb that means to misplace or be unable to find something.
    Word Confusion: Many, Much
    “Many” describes things we can count in numbers. This corresponds to using “number of.” “Much” describes things we cannot count. This corresponds to using “amount of.”
    Word Confusion: Passed, Past
    “Passed” is the past tense form of the verb pass, meaning to go by or go beyond. “Past” can be a noun or adjective indicating something existing in a time earlier than the present. “Past” can also be a preposition or adverb meaning beyond in time.
    Word Confusion: Passed, Past (Advanced)
    “Passed” is the past tense form of the verb pass, meaning to go by or go beyond. “Past” can be a noun or adjective indicating something existing in a time earlier than the present. “Past” can also be a preposition or adverb meaning beyond in time or position.
    Word Confusion: Precede, Proceed
    “Precede” is to come or exist before or to be in front of. “Proceed is to continue or go forward.
    Word Confusion: Prescribe, Proscribe
    “Prescribe” is to set rules or order medication or treatment. “Proscribe” is to prohibit, forbid, or condemn.
    Word Confusion: Than, Then
    “Than” is used to compare words or phrases. “Then” is used to indicate the time or order of events.
    Word Confusion: Than, Then (Advanced)
    “Then” is used to indicate the time or order of events. “Than” is used to compare words or phrases.
    Word Confusion: Their, There, They’re about Animals
    “Their” is a possessive form of the word “they.” “There” generally means “at or in that place” or can simply indicate existence as in “there is or there are.” “They’re” is a contraction of the words “they”¬†and “are.”
    Word Confusion: Their, There, They’re about Career, Office, Business
    “Their” is a possessive form of the word “they.” “They’re” is a contraction of the words “they” and “are.” “There” generally means “at or in that place” or can simply indicate existence as in “there are/is.”
    Word Confusion: Their, There, They’re about The City
    “Their” is a possessive form of the word “they.” “They’re” is a contraction of the words “they” and “are.” “There” generally means “at or in that place” or can simply indicate existence as in “there are/is.”

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